Frequently asked questions

Information on We Are All Dominican and Response to DR Constitutional Ruling.
We are all Dominican is a group of students, educators, and community activists, many of Dominican descent, organizing in NYC to denounce the Dominican Constitutional Court’s decision to strip more than 24,000 Dominicans of Haitian descent of their nationality, violating fundamental human rights. While the ruling addresses children born to foreigners in general terms, 92% of those impacted are Dominicans of Haitian descent (an estimated whopping 200,000 people)!
We are in solidarity with all migrants in the Dominican Republic and denounce any form of violence regardless of their legal status. At the same time we want to ensure that Dominicans of Haitian descent are legally recognized as Dominican nationals and not foreigners in their own country, as the Dominican state proposes to do through the recent court ruling and administrative practices implemented in previous years.
For the first time ever the Dominican Republic is defining Dominican identity in terms of racial and linguistic identifiers. We are advocating for an inclusive Dominican national identity that recognizes and celebrates our diversity.
We are alarmed by the decades long process that has sought to strip an entire ethnic group of their right to an education, employment, social services, as well as the right to vote and equal protection under the law. This decision is rendering an entire group of people stateless.
What are people planning going forward?
We Are All Dominican has developed an action toolkit (https://wearealldominicannyc.wordpress.com) for the community on which they will find a wide range of activities in which they can become involved.
We are currently circulating a petition asking that we hold our elected officials accountable and demand that they take a position against this ruling:(https://www.change.org/petitions/congressman-charles-rangel-tell-dr-officials-to-restore-the-rights-of-dominicans-of-haitian-descent-and-protect-the-rights-of-immigrants).
Haitian Women for Haitian Refugees is also providing training for educators who want to teach their students about this issue (Saturday, January 4 at Barnard College).  We are also asking individuals to share short video clips of themselves and others denouncing this sentence (https://www.facebook.com/WeAreAllDominican).
Finally this coming Saturday, Dominican@s X Derecho NY and We Are All Dominican — STREET OUTREACH Sat., 12/14 at 12PM in Washington Heights.
As we move forward we are looking for opportunities to raise awareness among students and activists as well as continue to build solidarity and support against racist and xenophobic policies that look to erase an entire people’s right to exist.
This week the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights concluded a visit to the Dominican Republic to study the impact of the Constitutional Court’s ruling. Their preliminary remarks state that the DR must restore the nationality of Dominicans affected by this ruling and cannot be treated as migrants.
We urge the President to work together with Dominicans affected by the ruling, human rights groups and civil society activists to find a solution to the grave social and political crisis that has followed the ruling, by restoring citizenship and other rights that the court ruling seeks to nullify.
We will continue to work closely with groups such as Dominicanxs x Derecho in NY and Dominican Republic to continue to build a movement of people in the Dominican Republic and the Diaspora speaking out against this issue.
Do people have a good understanding on what is fueling this ruling and action by the government?
Previous events as wells as future ones seek to speak truth to the ongoing campaign of misinformation by the media and Dominican government that wants to construe this as an issue of sovereignty, migratory regulation, and border security. We want to encourage the Dominican and Haitian diaspora to take action against these discriminatory policies.
We are greatly disappointed by the position taken by Dominican nationalist groups, which doesn’t allow for an open dialogue. More than ever we need to support activists in the Dominican Republic who are facing threats and being called traitors for demanding that their human rights be respected. Although many want to construe it that way, this is not about who can prove to be the most Dominican. This is about standing up for what is right.
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